By concentrating the thoughts, one can fly; by concentrating the desires, one falls.

. . .

Indolence of which a man is conscious, and indolence of which he is unconscious, are a thousand miles apart. Unconscious indolence is real indolence; conscious indolence is not complete indolence, because there is still some clarity in it.

Distraction omes from letting the mind wander about; indolence comes from the mind’s not yet being pure. Distraction is much easier to correct than indolence.

. . .

Only breathing serves to overcome indolence. Although the breath that flows in and out through the nose is not the true breath, the flowing in and out of the true breath takes place in connection with it.

While sitting, one must therefore always keep the heart quiet and the energy concentrated. How can the heart be made quiet? By the breath. Only the heart must be conscious of the flowing in and out of the breath; it must not be heard by the ears. If it is not heard, then the breathing is light; if light, it is pure.

If it can be heard, then the breath-energy is rough; if rough, then it is troubled; if it is troubled, then indolence and lethargy develop and one wants to sleep. That is self-evident.

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